Search result :petstools

Blog (6 résultats)

 

Ever since I read your biography, I have had Barbara’s song Göttingen stuck in my head (I’ve attached it to my email) and I have played her best-of all day long. Apart from this, according to your website from 2010, a strong identity has marked your creations, with the use of special fabrics and especially by your thoughts and way of thinking. It’s easy to feel the time you have spent observing the way of life of your acquaintances and how you translate this by making «shapeshifting» furniture or objects. Can you tell me more about your work process, your sensibilities and where you find your inspiration?
The story behind Barbara's song of Göttingen is really very moving. It's a lovely song and it's story shows what a big effect little but thoughtful gestures can have. The personal history and emotions that Barbara canalized through this song had an influence on so many people. It was her story, that so many people shared. It is literally unforgettable - I got an ear-worm from listening to it as well.... Do you know what an ear-worm is? In Germany it is what we call a song that gets stuck in your head, just like you described, an “Ohrwurm”.
Now to your other question : yes, 2010 was an important year. I made the Moody line at the end of 2010 as part of my graduation project. This was the first project I could fully concentrate on and my first step to becoming an independent designer. The idea of “Gemütlich-keit” (another typical German word) fascinates me and it has been an important source of inspiration for me since my graduation. This need to calm down, relax and feel at home is something we all share.
Also with the Moody line I discovered how much I love working with fabric. You just play around with it and see what happens : you shape it, sew it, pull it, tug it and squish it. I love the moment when it comes alive.
Watching and observing people and their behaviour is an important part of being a designer and one of my greatest hobbies! But most of all I watch myself and it seems that what I desire is pretty often what other people are looking for as well. Still you should of course not only focus on yourself, but it is a good starting point and it helps develop a sensitivity towards yourself and others. The Petstools grew out of the observation, that there is nothing nicer than putting your feet up and having a cuddle after a long day. It was developed for grown-ups (and not necessarily for kids) because I believe that grown-ups shouldn't take themselves too seriously all the time. At least when they are finally at home they should be allowed to have something humorous, fun and cuddly that brightens up their day.

I wasn’t so wrong with the Barbara’s song, it fits pretty well with your perception about ones own background and sensitivity which echoes with other peoples own story. I shared the “Gemütlich-keit“ experience during a Petite Friture meeting, we were all sat around the table and I was sitting on Fin, I just couldn’t help cuddling its head and ears. The Petstools can be astonishing and unexpected but this is the kind of object that we can easily adopt for our home.
I would now like to steer this conversation onto your universe and how as a German designer you found yourself working with a French editor?
You use German words to explain ideas and I really like it, sometimes a foreign word is more significant and closest to your meaning.
Can you think of some german words without equivalent?
The design world is very international. The collaboration with Petite Friture began after the furniture fair in Milan, where companies from all over the world get together and collaborations begin. When I think about it I have quite a few connections to France: I've just worked on a project with another nice French company and my last intern was French. Plus, I studied in Paris for one semester and so the connection to France is not new but there is one.
I don't see myself as a very German designer really... I am a designer born and raised in Germany, it's my home and of course I am influenced by the culture and way of life – I get my inspiration from everyday life here. My mother is American and so I also grew up knowing how a foreigner experiences Germany. Looking through an “outsider's” point of view makes us see things with some distance and is helpful for the design process. But even though we are all influenced by our cultural backgrounds, the present cultural borders are less present. We listen to the same music, watch the same youtube videos and look at the new designs on blogs from all over the world. That makes it difficult to categorize design nationally. German design is normally defined as being clear, reduced, minimalistic and functional... If that is German design, my design is not German.
My fondness for using these German words probably also came from working with my French intern these last months, who was very good with language and we enjoyed speaking English, combined with bits of German and French.
Eselsbrücke” is also a nice word describing a memory hook. It literally means “donkey bridge”, which is a nice image. I already mentioned “Gemütlichkeit” - this comes from the word “Gemüt”, this describes your inner emotional state, but means more than a mood. There are a few more interesting words known in other languages that describe an emotion like: “Weltschmerz” or “Schadenfreude”.

It’s seems like your roots are a perfect blending. I would like to learn more about the present cultural sharing. What I mean, in all this «pot-pourri» (french word for an eclectic mix of various things), why do some things catch your attention and others don’t? How does this interact with your design process? And what was your last discovery?
I am thrilled when I come across something unexpected. This can be something fun, humorous or challenging. Things catch my attention when they are beautiful but unprocessed, meaning that they are not yet transformed into design. This can be scraps in a paper-bin, a fruit basket at the market or a metal fence in Venice. I carry these images around in my mind and have no clue what to do with them. This “pot-pourri” of random shapes and colours helps to form a more concrete idea later on. So I think it’s very inspiring to look to different cultures or even just different households. With a shift of perspective something that seems unexciting on first glance can be super beautiful and set off the idea you have been looking for. This is actually also why I don’t check blogs so often – the ideas are already processed. It is interesting to see what other designers are doing and important to know what is going on, but I try not to check design blogs too often. If I do and I need to get ideas for patterns I sometimes like to float on: patternity.org/.

About nationally categorized design, the more I think about it, the more it seems like nonsense to me. Each day I see new examples of designers using foreign influence, and it makes everything so richer and deeper, and creates astonishing ideas. What could be the existing project that fitted with this thought for you?
The swedish design duo Glimpt (http://www.glimpt.se/) comes to my mind when I think about projects inspired by different cultures. I met them at the D3 contest of the IMM in Cologne a few years ago and have followed their work since then. They work with craftsmen in several countries all over the world and create a blend of traditional craftsmanship and scandinavian design. It is a very nice and honest concept and the stories behind the projects are just as fascinating as the objects themselves. They let other cultural influences inspire their work very consequently, but most designs are influenced by what designers/craftsmen on other parts of the world are up to, even if it is not a clear concept. Production is often done in a different country, the design fairs are all over the world, we want to work with international operating labels because, in the end we all hope to sell our products in other countries as well.

 

Ever since I read your biography, I have had Barbara’s song Göttingen stuck in my head (I’ve attached it to my email) and I have played her best-of all day long. Apart from this, according to your website from 2010, a strong identity has marked your creations, with the use of special fabrics and especially by your thoughts and way of thinking. It’s easy to feel the time you have spent observing the way of life of your acquaintances and how you translate this by making «shapeshifting» furniture or objects. Can you tell me more about your work process, your sensibilities and where you find your inspiration?
The story behind Barbara's song of Göttingen is really very moving. It's a lovely song and it's story shows what a big effect little but thoughtful gestures can have. The personal history and emotions that Barbara canalized through this song had an influence on so many people. It was her story, that so many people shared. It is literally unforgettable - I got an ear-worm from listening to it as well.... Do you know what an ear-worm is? In Germany it is what we call a song that gets stuck in your head, just like you described, an “Ohrwurm”.
Now to your other question : yes, 2010 was an important year. I made the Moody line at the end of 2010 as part of my graduation project. This was the first project I could fully concentrate on and my first step to becoming an independent designer. The idea of “Gemütlich-keit” (another typical German word) fascinates me and it has been an important source of inspiration for me since my graduation. This need to calm down, relax and feel at home is something we all share.
Also with the Moody line I discovered how much I love working with fabric. You just play around with it and see what happens : you shape it, sew it, pull it, tug it and squish it. I love the moment when it comes alive.
Watching and observing people and their behaviour is an important part of being a designer and one of my greatest hobbies! But most of all I watch myself and it seems that what I desire is pretty often what other people are looking for as well. Still you should of course not only focus on yourself, but it is a good starting point and it helps develop a sensitivity towards yourself and others. The Petstools grew out of the observation, that there is nothing nicer than putting your feet up and having a cuddle after a long day. It was developed for grown-ups (and not necessarily for kids) because I believe that grown-ups shouldn't take themselves too seriously all the time. At least when they are finally at home they should be allowed to have something humorous, fun and cuddly that brightens up their day.

I wasn’t so wrong with the Barbara’s song, it fits pretty well with your perception about ones own background and sensitivity which echoes with other peoples own story. I shared the “Gemütlich-keit“ experience during a Petite Friture meeting, we were all sat around the table and I was sitting on Fin, I just couldn’t help cuddling its head and ears. The Petstools can be astonishing and unexpected but this is the kind of object that we can easily adopt for our home.
I would now like to steer this conversation onto your universe and how as a German designer you found yourself working with a French editor?
You use German words to explain ideas and I really like it, sometimes a foreign word is more significant and closest to your meaning.
Can you think of some german words without equivalent?
The design world is very international. The collaboration with Petite Friture began after the furniture fair in Milan, where companies from all over the world get together and collaborations begin. When I think about it I have quite a few connections to France: I've just worked on a project with another nice French company and my last intern was French. Plus, I studied in Paris for one semester and so the connection to France is not new but there is one.
I don't see myself as a very German designer really... I am a designer born and raised in Germany, it's my home and of course I am influenced by the culture and way of life – I get my inspiration from everyday life here. My mother is American and so I also grew up knowing how a foreigner experiences Germany. Looking through an “outsider's” point of view makes us see things with some distance and is helpful for the design process. But even though we are all influenced by our cultural backgrounds, the present cultural borders are less present. We listen to the same music, watch the same youtube videos and look at the new designs on blogs from all over the world. That makes it difficult to categorize design nationally. German design is normally defined as being clear, reduced, minimalistic and functional... If that is German design, my design is not German.
My fondness for using these German words probably also came from working with my French intern these last months, who was very good with language and we enjoyed speaking English, combined with bits of German and French.
Eselsbrücke” is also a nice word describing a memory hook. It literally means “donkey bridge”, which is a nice image. I already mentioned “Gemütlichkeit” - this comes from the word “Gemüt”, this describes your inner emotional state, but means more than a mood. There are a few more interesting words known in other languages that describe an emotion like: “Weltschmerz” or “Schadenfreude”.

It’s seems like your roots are a perfect blending. I would like to learn more about the present cultural sharing. What I mean, in all this «pot-pourri» (french word for an eclectic mix of various things), why do some things catch your attention and others don’t? How does this interact with your design process? And what was your last discovery?
I am thrilled when I come across something unexpected. This can be something fun, humorous or challenging. Things catch my attention when they are beautiful but unprocessed, meaning that they are not yet transformed into design. This can be scraps in a paper-bin, a fruit basket at the market or a metal fence in Venice. I carry these images around in my mind and have no clue what to do with them. This “pot-pourri” of random shapes and colours helps to form a more concrete idea later on. So I think it’s very inspiring to look to different cultures or even just different households. With a shift of perspective something that seems unexciting on first glance can be super beautiful and set off the idea you have been looking for. This is actually also why I don’t check blogs so often – the ideas are already processed. It is interesting to see what other designers are doing and important to know what is going on, but I try not to check design blogs too often. If I do and I need to get ideas for patterns I sometimes like to float on: patternity.org/.

About nationally categorized design, the more I think about it, the more it seems like nonsense to me. Each day I see new examples of designers using foreign influence, and it makes everything so richer and deeper, and creates astonishing ideas. What could be the existing project that fitted with this thought for you?
The swedish design duo Glimpt (http://www.glimpt.se/) comes to my mind when I think about projects inspired by different cultures. I met them at the D3 contest of the IMM in Cologne a few years ago and have followed their work since then. They work with craftsmen in several countries all over the world and create a blend of traditional craftsmanship and scandinavian design. It is a very nice and honest concept and the stories behind the projects are just as fascinating as the objects themselves. They let other cultural influences inspire their work very consequently, but most designs are influenced by what designers/craftsmen on other parts of the world are up to, even if it is not a clear concept. Production is often done in a different country, the design fairs are all over the world, we want to work with international operating labels because, in the end we all hope to sell our products in other countries as well.

 

Ever since I read your biography, I have had Barbara’s song Göttingen stuck in my head (I’ve attached it to my email) and I have played her best-of all day long. Apart from this, according to your website from 2010, a strong identity has marked your creations, with the use of special fabrics and especially by your thoughts and way of thinking. It’s easy to feel the time you have spent observing the way of life of your acquaintances and how you translate this by making «shapeshifting» furniture or objects. Can you tell me more about your work process, your sensibilities and where you find your inspiration?
The story behind Barbara's song of Göttingen is really very moving. It's a lovely song and it's story shows what a big effect little but thoughtful gestures can have. The personal history and emotions that Barbara canalized through this song had an influence on so many people. It was her story, that so many people shared. It is literally unforgettable - I got an ear-worm from listening to it as well.... Do you know what an ear-worm is? In Germany it is what we call a song that gets stuck in your head, just like you described, an “Ohrwurm”.
Now to your other question : yes, 2010 was an important year. I made the Moody line at the end of 2010 as part of my graduation project. This was the first project I could fully concentrate on and my first step to becoming an independent designer. The idea of “Gemütlich-keit” (another typical German word) fascinates me and it has been an important source of inspiration for me since my graduation. This need to calm down, relax and feel at home is something we all share.
Also with the Moody line I discovered how much I love working with fabric. You just play around with it and see what happens : you shape it, sew it, pull it, tug it and squish it. I love the moment when it comes alive.
Watching and observing people and their behaviour is an important part of being a designer and one of my greatest hobbies! But most of all I watch myself and it seems that what I desire is pretty often what other people are looking for as well. Still you should of course not only focus on yourself, but it is a good starting point and it helps develop a sensitivity towards yourself and others. The Petstools grew out of the observation, that there is nothing nicer than putting your feet up and having a cuddle after a long day. It was developed for grown-ups (and not necessarily for kids) because I believe that grown-ups shouldn't take themselves too seriously all the time. At least when they are finally at home they should be allowed to have something humorous, fun and cuddly that brightens up their day.

I wasn’t so wrong with the Barbara’s song, it fits pretty well with your perception about ones own background and sensitivity which echoes with other peoples own story. I shared the “Gemütlich-keit“ experience during a Petite Friture meeting, we were all sat around the table and I was sitting on Fin, I just couldn’t help cuddling its head and ears. The Petstools can be astonishing and unexpected but this is the kind of object that we can easily adopt for our home.
I would now like to steer this conversation onto your universe and how as a German designer you found yourself working with a French editor?
You use German words to explain ideas and I really like it, sometimes a foreign word is more significant and closest to your meaning.
Can you think of some german words without equivalent?
The design world is very international. The collaboration with Petite Friture began after the furniture fair in Milan, where companies from all over the world get together and collaborations begin. When I think about it I have quite a few connections to France: I've just worked on a project with another nice French company and my last intern was French. Plus, I studied in Paris for one semester and so the connection to France is not new but there is one.
I don't see myself as a very German designer really... I am a designer born and raised in Germany, it's my home and of course I am influenced by the culture and way of life – I get my inspiration from everyday life here. My mother is American and so I also grew up knowing how a foreigner experiences Germany. Looking through an “outsider's” point of view makes us see things with some distance and is helpful for the design process. But even though we are all influenced by our cultural backgrounds, the present cultural borders are less present. We listen to the same music, watch the same youtube videos and look at the new designs on blogs from all over the world. That makes it difficult to categorize design nationally. German design is normally defined as being clear, reduced, minimalistic and functional... If that is German design, my design is not German.
My fondness for using these German words probably also came from working with my French intern these last months, who was very good with language and we enjoyed speaking English, combined with bits of German and French.
Eselsbrücke” is also a nice word describing a memory hook. It literally means “donkey bridge”, which is a nice image. I already mentioned “Gemütlichkeit” - this comes from the word “Gemüt”, this describes your inner emotional state, but means more than a mood. There are a few more interesting words known in other languages that describe an emotion like: “Weltschmerz” or “Schadenfreude”.

It’s seems like your roots are a perfect blending. I would like to learn more about the present cultural sharing. What I mean, in all this «pot-pourri» (french word for an eclectic mix of various things), why do some things catch your attention and others don’t? How does this interact with your design process? And what was your last discovery?
I am thrilled when I come across something unexpected. This can be something fun, humorous or challenging. Things catch my attention when they are beautiful but unprocessed, meaning that they are not yet transformed into design. This can be scraps in a paper-bin, a fruit basket at the market or a metal fence in Venice. I carry these images around in my mind and have no clue what to do with them. This “pot-pourri” of random shapes and colours helps to form a more concrete idea later on. So I think it’s very inspiring to look to different cultures or even just different households. With a shift of perspective something that seems unexciting on first glance can be super beautiful and set off the idea you have been looking for. This is actually also why I don’t check blogs so often – the ideas are already processed. It is interesting to see what other designers are doing and important to know what is going on, but I try not to check design blogs too often. If I do and I need to get ideas for patterns I sometimes like to float on: patternity.org/.

About nationally categorized design, the more I think about it, the more it seems like nonsense to me. Each day I see new examples of designers using foreign influence, and it makes everything so richer and deeper, and creates astonishing ideas. What could be the existing project that fitted with this thought for you?
The swedish design duo Glimpt (http://www.glimpt.se/) comes to my mind when I think about projects inspired by different cultures. I met them at the D3 contest of the IMM in Cologne a few years ago and have followed their work since then. They work with craftsmen in several countries all over the world and create a blend of traditional craftsmanship and scandinavian design. It is a very nice and honest concept and the stories behind the projects are just as fascinating as the objects themselves. They let other cultural influences inspire their work very consequently, but most designs are influenced by what designers/craftsmen on other parts of the world are up to, even if it is not a clear concept. Production is often done in a different country, the design fairs are all over the world, we want to work with international operating labels because, in the end we all hope to sell our products in other countries as well.

Collection (3 results)

PETSTOOLS Ella

Petstools Ella

stools

Hanna Ernsting

PETSTOOLS Daisy

Petstools Daisy

stools

Hanna Ernsting

PETSTOOLS Fin

Petstools Fin

Stools

Hanna Ernsting